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 Wednesday, 08 July 2015
Anna Maria Flechero: Within the Fourteenth Hour PDF Print
Written by Carmel DeSoto   
Sunday, 29 June 2008

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Within the Fourteenth Hour
 

Vocalist Anna Maria Flechero is the product of a culturally rich heritage and a vibrant musical environment. Born in San Francisco of African American and Filipino ancestry, she learned to play piano by ear as a youngster, writing tunes and lyrics that reflect the influences of the sounds of Motown and the Latin rhythms of her Mission District. Moving to Japan, Flechero honed her skills as a solo artist, accompanying herself on piano, composing and performing original songs and interpreting jazz standards. While in Japan, Anna Maria met legendary pianist Cedar Walton, who provided opportunities for her to perform with his trio. It was the beginning of a long-standing musical friendship.

Now in 2008, after hundreds of performances and years of creating her own personal style, Flechero once again had the opportunity to coordinate with Walton on her self-produced sophomore release, Within the Fourteenth Hour.  This soulful recording features 10 well-placed pop and jazz standards with a bonus track being an original Flechero cut entitled “Pretty Soon.”

The journey begins with the classic standard “Misty,” fashioned into a swinging up-beat track that is personified by Flechero’s distinctive voice and R&B inflections.  This track features the incomparable Cedar Walton, David Williams and Lewis Nash.  Their symbiosis is evident from the first notes, clearly articulating an atmosphere of interaction and chemistry.  The first “A” features Williams and Nash trading rhythmically active phrases, while Walton’ s solo lines dance atop, creating interest and bounce within the spaces of Flechero’s vocals.  This symbiosis allows Flechero to command the cut with playful passages and confident scat lines that clearly punctuate the setting as being a true jazz cut.

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Anna Maria Flechero
“What A Difference a Day Makes” has a Smooth Jazz/Latin overtone, extremely cross-over in nature, that shines a new light on this Grever/Adams classic, transporting you to a sunny beach with cocktails, friends and good times.  Flechero’s breezy vocals and phrasing allude to Jamaican flavors, a playful summery cut that gets you ready for the weekend.  This track features Jeffrey Chin (piano), Ron Smith (guitar), Nelson Braxton (bass), Billy Johnson (drums), Melecio Magdaluyo (sax), and the bus-driver to this track’s instrumental flavor, Karl Perazzo (percussion).  The ensemble provides a relaxed samba feel over which Magdaluyo plays a melodic and thoughtful solo.  Flechero adds nice vocal ornamentations to the last statement of the melody and the vamp out.

The Cedar Walton Trio guests once again on “God Bless the Child,” creating a strong traditional jazz interpretation of this Billy Holiday standard.  This cut gives us the chance to see an intimate, more serious side of Anna Maria’s vocals as she conveys a storyline of honesty and sincerity with each passing phrase.  Walton’s trio creates a metric modulation within the solo section, creating a nice texture change within the cut.  Flechero sells the track to the final low note while Walton, Nash and Williams delicately punctuate the final outro.  
 

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Anna Maria Flechero
Anna Maria’s incomparable voice creates a voyage from start to finish, each song having its own specialty and flavor to truly create a diverse passage from track, to track, but it is in the final cut, “Pretty Soon,” where we get a full view of Anna’s abilities as a lyricist and composer.  Her lyrics convey a story of one who has lived through many facets of life, including the death of a loved one.  It is a song of devotion, strength and endurance.  Musically, Anna Maria has created a beautiful composition that is texturally stunning and harmonically rich.  Within the Fourteenth Hour is a CD worth adding to any music aficionado’s CD collection. Whether your desire is jazz, island, smooth-jazz, Latin, nu-soul, old soul or to heal your soul, this is the CD for you.  Take the journey Within the Fourteenth Hour.



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