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  Home arrow CD/DVD/Book Reviews arrow Cecile McLorin Salvant: "Woman Child" (Mack Avenue, 2013)
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 Saturday, 28 November 2015
Cecile McLorin Salvant: "Woman Child" (Mack Avenue, 2013) PDF Print
Written by Andrea Canter, Contributing Editor   
Thursday, 20 June 2013

Woman Child

"If music came with a ‘100% natural and organic” sticker, this CD would have it on the cover. This is music of the human heart. Undiluted. Timeless.”  Ted Gioia (liner note, Woman Child)


In the 2010 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Vocalists Competition, a young woman barely into her 20s seemingly came out of nowhere to take top honors. And now that same young singer, at 23, has released a remarkable recording for Mack Avenue Records, aptly titled Woman Child.


 Cecile McLorin Salvant, Photo by JP Dodell
Cecile McLorin Salvant, Photo by JP Dodell
Who is Cecile McLorin Salvant? Born and raised in Miami of French and Haitian parents, Salvant started classical piano at age 5, sang in the Miami Choral Society at age 8, and went to France to study law and classical voice (at the Darius Milhaud Conservatory in Aix-en-Provence). There she became immersed in improvisation (instrumental and vocal), working with clarinetist Jean-François Bonnel. She made her first recording, Cecile, with Bonnel’s Paris quintet, and a year later, won the Monk Competition.  The contract with Mack Avenue and a January 2013 appearance on Piano Jazz: Rising Stars followed, as well as the opportunity to lend her voice to Chanel’s “Chance” ad campaign. McLorin Salvant’s star has been on a fast rise, but perhaps none of her achievements sufficiently predicted the startling maturity of Woman Child.

Salvant’s choice of material reflects her interest in the less familiar, seldom recorded repertoire of jazz and blues, from early 20th century through the full history of the music, as well as her own talents as composer, lyricist and (on one track) pianist. Her apparent sources of inspiration cover the legends from Bessie Smith to Billie Holiday, from Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughn to Nina Simone, Abbey Lincoln and Betty Carter. Especially for a young singer, such muses can also inspire imitation. Noted Cecile in a recent interview for Downbeat, “ Following all the great vocalists in this music, how do you make it your own?...You have to remember yourself in the music—express your thing.” Already, McLorin Salvant seems to have no trouble expressing her thing. There is no note of imitation – this is an artist who has an uncanny ability to meld classical training, improvisational talent, and dramatic flair into a wide-ranging and unique voice. Her cohorts on Woman Child were well chosen to support her journey, including another young virtuoso, pianist Aaron Diehl, along with veterans, bassist Rodney Whitaker, guitarist/banjoist James Chirillo, and drummer Herlin Riley.

Woman Child starts off with J. Russel Robinson’s “St. Louis Blues,” recorded 90 years ago by Bessie Smith. Notes McLorin Salvant, “Bessie became a fundamental part of how I approached singing this music, her balance of vulnerable and strong.” It’s a balance Cecile finds throughout the album. Other than the clarity of the recording, you might think you are listening to Bessie herself as Cecile, accompanied only by James Chirillo’s guitar, sings with a lilting, sultry, nuanced flirtiness, perfectly holding notes that add to the coquettish delivery. An even earlier choice, “Nobody” (Bert Williams and Alex Rogers) comes from the early 1900s musical, Abyssinia. Cecile finds both the humor and honesty of the lyric, her shifting moods mirrored by Diehl’s alternately prancing and balladic accompaniment; and Riley’s two snare hits add a comic touch to the finish.

Aaron DiehlİAndrea Canter
Bessie Smith most famously covered Clarence Wiliams’ “Baby Have Pity on Me” in 1930 – at least most famously until McLorin Salvant picked it up for Woman Child. With Chirillo’s supportive counterpoint and some abstract interjections from Aaron Diehl, she lands somewhere between Bessie and Billie, delivering a classic sultry blues with a strong current of hope. Jumping a generation, McLorin Salvant seamlessly follows an original, elegant instrumental “Prelude” composed by Diehl with “There’s a Lull in My Life” (Gordon and Revel), from the playlists of Ella Fitzgerald and Nat King Cole. There’s a 30s-40s sound (“the clock stops ticking… the world stops turning…”) as Cecile make her pain beautiful, timeless, almost seductive, with hints of Billie, Ella, and particularly Sarah Vaughan.

One of two songbook standards, Rogers and Hart’s “I Didn’t Know What Time It Was” also suggests Sarah to some degree. Diehl’s staccato piano chords and Riley’s caressing brushes accompany the singer’s first verse, yet only the voice carries the melody as Cecile pulls the listener in close to hear the story. A bass-fed interlude leads into Whitaker’s swinging solo, repeating the storyline without words; Diehl’s solo is filled with exquisite lines. Sticking with the lyric (no scatting!), McLorin Salvant nevertheless fills her last verse with horn-like phrases; like a taffy pull, she tugs salty and sweet from those words, placing accents where you might least expect them. And her vocalese energizes Harry Woods’ “What a Little Moonlight Can Do,” stretched over 8+ minutes. Her use of phrasing, timing, and tempo is so elastic that, while the band offers incomparable support, you also sense that the instrumentation was totally unnecessary—McLorin Salvant creates the sounds of an ensemble by herself, and seductively so. Diehl does strut his stuff on the instrumental interlude, with runs at breakneck speed in his right hand and slower comping from left, using multiple voices just like McLorin Salvant. Whitaker also solos in rapid fire fashion, while Cecile then keeps the listener off balance by slowing it down only to speed up again, and slow it down again before the brisk finale. Her unforgettable last line pierces the stratosphere at the top of her (or anyone’s?) range.

Two tracks in particular address the African American experience as reinterpretations of the past from a more contemporary perspective, not to defy or correct but to re-examine and revisit. The arrangement of the traditional “John Henry” brings a Latin slant to the rhythm, Cecile’s voice nearly a capella, with no melody at all coming from her heavily percussive (hammering!) band. But it’s the inclusion of Sam Caslow’s “You Bring Out the Savage in Me” that serves as the album’s vortex. Taking the song from the 1935 repertoire of singer/trumpeter Valadia Snow, McLorin Salvant turns the “jungle music” stereotype inside out. Without scatting a note, she becomes a snaky horn, manipulating her voice via dynamics, note choices and phrasing, stabbing at the social norms of the 30s with such power and energy that the song, in the hands of this seductive sorceress, works in 2013. “I think you can make fun of the idea of jazz as 'savage music' even while wanting to be primal,” says Cecile in the album’s liner note.

Rodney WhittakerİAndrea Canter
The remaining tracks highlight McLorin Salvant’s talents as composer and pianist.  Cecile wrote the music for “Le Front Cachet Sur Tes Genoux” (literally, “the front seal on your knees”), using the text of a poem by  Haitian Ida Faubert  (“Rondel”), which as I can best translate is a sad love poem. At home in her "other" native language, McLorin Salvant creates a beautiful waltzing ballad regardless of meaning. With her crystal clear articulation, those comfortable with the language will easily translate. Diehl and Whitaker provide elegant solos in support.  The brief closing track, the original “Deep Dark Blue,” is a tragic, not sweet ballad, with a sharp edge that cuts through any suggestion of wistful longing.  Cecile’s title tune opens and closes with Whitaker’s bass comments. An Abbey-Lincoln-esque anthem to women’s independence, this song fully displays McLorin Salvant’s musical and emotional range, as well as Diehl’s stylistic arc, from light swing to multi-layered symphonics.

Perhaps most surprising of all is Cecile’s tour de force on “Jitterbug Waltz.” Accompanying herself (solo) on piano, she uses a three-note vamp throughout the song and alternates her higher and lower voices as if carrying on a two-way conversation. Like the many roots of her vocal music, McLorin Salvant’s piano seems part Waller in its swinging energy, part Monk in its wide voicings and rhythmic somersaults, and every bit as intriguing as her voice—sweet, sassy, intelligent and bold.

Few modern vocalists manage to so successfully recall the past while keeping eye and ear in the present, and to do so with such precision in intonation, articulation and overall musicianship. That Cecile McLorin Salvant is at this pinnacle at age 23 is a bit scary. Fortunately, she seems fearless.


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New Releases: Clarke/Lagrene/Ponty and Lionel Loueke
Written by Kevin O'Connor   

ImageWhat’s that parental axiom and admonishment to writers who gleefully pan things that come across their desk?  “If you can’t say anything nice…..” Truth told, a busy month fundraising at KBEM and a general lackluster crop of recordings have kept me away for a while. But the mailman was especially kind this week.

Stanley Clarke/Bireli Lagrène/Jean-Luc Ponty, D-Stringz (Impulse, 2015)

If Frank Zappa were to suddenly open a Parisian café in Chocolate City, it would sound like this record. The theme on this delightful excursion, if there is one, seems to be a hot club style litmus test of jazz hits and a great vehicle to try new wares.

Stanley Clarke and Jean-Luc Ponty are household names, even to people who may have a casual acquaintance with jazz, especially fusion.  Ponty is known for his work with Frank Zappa as well as his equally astonishing solo career.  And Stanley Clarke has all but reconstructed what it means to be a bassist in any kind of music. Lesser known to some, guitarist Bireli Lagrène comes from the classic French mold of Reinhardt-laced gypsy swing. But he’s also good at dancing around the fringes of soul, blues, flamenco, jazz and whatever else can be played on guitar.   

With nothing whatsoever to prove, these men will make you rethink how to listen to some of your favorites like: “Blue Train” and “Mercy Mercy  Mercy.” They could have stopped there and phoned the rest in. They didn’t. Check out all the originals.  Highly recommended.

Lionel Loueke,  Gaia (Blue Note, 2015)

ImageWhen the news broke that Pop producer Don Was would be helming Blue Note Records after the death of the beloved Bruce Lundvall, the predictable waves of angst fell over the jazz community.  As it turns out, those fears were not entirely unfounded.  Was has (yes, that’s grammatically acceptable) steered the iconic brand away from the sacred stables built by Lundvall and all his forebears. Many fled the company or were perhaps encouraged to seek other distribution.

But artists like Joe Lovano and Dr. John appear to have remained. Whether that is due to their crossover appeal is uncertain.  Lionel Loueke is a poster child of musical morphing, mostly in the global vein. Whatever stylistic cross-dressing he is guilty of has never been conspicuous or pre-meditated. Born in Benin, West Africa, the guitarist was weaned on a strong dose of musical variety: West African blues, Kora music, Afro-Pop and Afro Caribbean rhythms are strong threads that are immediately noticeable in his playing.  He also displays impeccable choices of companions on the road and in the studio.

Like Bill Frisell, Loueke’s pure musicianship transcends any genre bias and has made him a top recruit for many established jazz masters.  Gaia finds him breaking away from the “World Music” stamp. It is moody and compositional, with very little in the way of beat fare.  The title track is great and there’s a serviceable Bee Gees cover, too. I won’t tell you what, explore for yourself!

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Lizz Wright: "Freedom And Surrender" (Concord, 2015)
Written by Kevin O'Connor   


Another artist from the cover school is Lizz Wright, though that term is neither fair nor accurate with her latest recording, Freedom And Surrender.

Circular would be a good word to describe the career arc of Ms. Wright. She was signed by Verve Records in the early 2000’s during the late phases of the great Diana Krall fallout. Stylistically she couldn’t be more opposed. She went on to a modest career in Pop and R & B and is just now back in the jazz crossover realm at Concord Records.

She has clearly maintained her soulful sensibilities and jazz reverence. But along the way, she’s picked up an incredible knack for lyricism and a shrewd ear for collaboration. Guitarist and producer Larry Klein was a music and life partner for a late and crucial phase in Joni Mitchell’s narrative.  He’s all over this one, too:  Chief production, playing, songwriting and hand claps kept him pretty busy.

Nick Drake’s aching “River Man” is paid a nice tribute.  The best originals would have to be the title track and one called “You.” Although Gregory Porter is rapidly entering the venue of the overexposed, I’d rather hear him than the aforementioned Mr. McDonald on most anything. Wright and Porter team up on another original, “Right Where You Are.”  Straight ahead? Not really. But a beautiful diversion.

(Lizz Wright appears at the Dakota in Minneapolis, September 22-23;

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