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  Home arrow CD/DVD/Book Reviews arrow Cecile McLorin Salvant: "Woman Child" (Mack Avenue, 2013)
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 Monday, 28 July 2014
Cecile McLorin Salvant: "Woman Child" (Mack Avenue, 2013) PDF Print
Written by Andrea Canter, Contributing Editor   
Thursday, 20 June 2013

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Woman Child
 

"If music came with a ‘100% natural and organic” sticker, this CD would have it on the cover. This is music of the human heart. Undiluted. Timeless.”  Ted Gioia (liner note, Woman Child)

 

In the 2010 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Vocalists Competition, a young woman barely into her 20s seemingly came out of nowhere to take top honors. And now that same young singer, at 23, has released a remarkable recording for Mack Avenue Records, aptly titled Woman Child.

 

 Cecile McLorin Salvant, Photo by JP Dodell
Cecile McLorin Salvant, Photo by JP Dodell
Who is Cecile McLorin Salvant? Born and raised in Miami of French and Haitian parents, Salvant started classical piano at age 5, sang in the Miami Choral Society at age 8, and went to France to study law and classical voice (at the Darius Milhaud Conservatory in Aix-en-Provence). There she became immersed in improvisation (instrumental and vocal), working with clarinetist Jean-François Bonnel. She made her first recording, Cecile, with Bonnel’s Paris quintet, and a year later, won the Monk Competition.  The contract with Mack Avenue and a January 2013 appearance on Piano Jazz: Rising Stars followed, as well as the opportunity to lend her voice to Chanel’s “Chance” ad campaign. McLorin Salvant’s star has been on a fast rise, but perhaps none of her achievements sufficiently predicted the startling maturity of Woman Child.

Salvant’s choice of material reflects her interest in the less familiar, seldom recorded repertoire of jazz and blues, from early 20th century through the full history of the music, as well as her own talents as composer, lyricist and (on one track) pianist. Her apparent sources of inspiration cover the legends from Bessie Smith to Billie Holiday, from Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughn to Nina Simone, Abbey Lincoln and Betty Carter. Especially for a young singer, such muses can also inspire imitation. Noted Cecile in a recent interview for Downbeat, “ Following all the great vocalists in this music, how do you make it your own?...You have to remember yourself in the music—express your thing.” Already, McLorin Salvant seems to have no trouble expressing her thing. There is no note of imitation – this is an artist who has an uncanny ability to meld classical training, improvisational talent, and dramatic flair into a wide-ranging and unique voice. Her cohorts on Woman Child were well chosen to support her journey, including another young virtuoso, pianist Aaron Diehl, along with veterans, bassist Rodney Whitaker, guitarist/banjoist James Chirillo, and drummer Herlin Riley.

Woman Child starts off with J. Russel Robinson’s “St. Louis Blues,” recorded 90 years ago by Bessie Smith. Notes McLorin Salvant, “Bessie became a fundamental part of how I approached singing this music, her balance of vulnerable and strong.” It’s a balance Cecile finds throughout the album. Other than the clarity of the recording, you might think you are listening to Bessie herself as Cecile, accompanied only by James Chirillo’s guitar, sings with a lilting, sultry, nuanced flirtiness, perfectly holding notes that add to the coquettish delivery. An even earlier choice, “Nobody” (Bert Williams and Alex Rogers) comes from the early 1900s musical, Abyssinia. Cecile finds both the humor and honesty of the lyric, her shifting moods mirrored by Diehl’s alternately prancing and balladic accompaniment; and Riley’s two snare hits add a comic touch to the finish.

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Aaron DiehlİAndrea Canter
Bessie Smith most famously covered Clarence Wiliams’ “Baby Have Pity on Me” in 1930 – at least most famously until McLorin Salvant picked it up for Woman Child. With Chirillo’s supportive counterpoint and some abstract interjections from Aaron Diehl, she lands somewhere between Bessie and Billie, delivering a classic sultry blues with a strong current of hope. Jumping a generation, McLorin Salvant seamlessly follows an original, elegant instrumental “Prelude” composed by Diehl with “There’s a Lull in My Life” (Gordon and Revel), from the playlists of Ella Fitzgerald and Nat King Cole. There’s a 30s-40s sound (“the clock stops ticking… the world stops turning…”) as Cecile make her pain beautiful, timeless, almost seductive, with hints of Billie, Ella, and particularly Sarah Vaughan.

One of two songbook standards, Rogers and Hart’s “I Didn’t Know What Time It Was” also suggests Sarah to some degree. Diehl’s staccato piano chords and Riley’s caressing brushes accompany the singer’s first verse, yet only the voice carries the melody as Cecile pulls the listener in close to hear the story. A bass-fed interlude leads into Whitaker’s swinging solo, repeating the storyline without words; Diehl’s solo is filled with exquisite lines. Sticking with the lyric (no scatting!), McLorin Salvant nevertheless fills her last verse with horn-like phrases; like a taffy pull, she tugs salty and sweet from those words, placing accents where you might least expect them. And her vocalese energizes Harry Woods’ “What a Little Moonlight Can Do,” stretched over 8+ minutes. Her use of phrasing, timing, and tempo is so elastic that, while the band offers incomparable support, you also sense that the instrumentation was totally unnecessary—McLorin Salvant creates the sounds of an ensemble by herself, and seductively so. Diehl does strut his stuff on the instrumental interlude, with runs at breakneck speed in his right hand and slower comping from left, using multiple voices just like McLorin Salvant. Whitaker also solos in rapid fire fashion, while Cecile then keeps the listener off balance by slowing it down only to speed up again, and slow it down again before the brisk finale. Her unforgettable last line pierces the stratosphere at the top of her (or anyone’s?) range.

Two tracks in particular address the African American experience as reinterpretations of the past from a more contemporary perspective, not to defy or correct but to re-examine and revisit. The arrangement of the traditional “John Henry” brings a Latin slant to the rhythm, Cecile’s voice nearly a capella, with no melody at all coming from her heavily percussive (hammering!) band. But it’s the inclusion of Sam Caslow’s “You Bring Out the Savage in Me” that serves as the album’s vortex. Taking the song from the 1935 repertoire of singer/trumpeter Valadia Snow, McLorin Salvant turns the “jungle music” stereotype inside out. Without scatting a note, she becomes a snaky horn, manipulating her voice via dynamics, note choices and phrasing, stabbing at the social norms of the 30s with such power and energy that the song, in the hands of this seductive sorceress, works in 2013. “I think you can make fun of the idea of jazz as 'savage music' even while wanting to be primal,” says Cecile in the album’s liner note.

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Rodney WhittakerİAndrea Canter
The remaining tracks highlight McLorin Salvant’s talents as composer and pianist.  Cecile wrote the music for “Le Front Cachet Sur Tes Genoux” (literally, “the front seal on your knees”), using the text of a poem by  Haitian Ida Faubert  (“Rondel”), which as I can best translate is a sad love poem. At home in her "other" native language, McLorin Salvant creates a beautiful waltzing ballad regardless of meaning. With her crystal clear articulation, those comfortable with the language will easily translate. Diehl and Whitaker provide elegant solos in support.  The brief closing track, the original “Deep Dark Blue,” is a tragic, not sweet ballad, with a sharp edge that cuts through any suggestion of wistful longing.  Cecile’s title tune opens and closes with Whitaker’s bass comments. An Abbey-Lincoln-esque anthem to women’s independence, this song fully displays McLorin Salvant’s musical and emotional range, as well as Diehl’s stylistic arc, from light swing to multi-layered symphonics.

Perhaps most surprising of all is Cecile’s tour de force on “Jitterbug Waltz.” Accompanying herself (solo) on piano, she uses a three-note vamp throughout the song and alternates her higher and lower voices as if carrying on a two-way conversation. Like the many roots of her vocal music, McLorin Salvant’s piano seems part Waller in its swinging energy, part Monk in its wide voicings and rhythmic somersaults, and every bit as intriguing as her voice—sweet, sassy, intelligent and bold.

Few modern vocalists manage to so successfully recall the past while keeping eye and ear in the present, and to do so with such precision in intonation, articulation and overall musicianship. That Cecile McLorin Salvant is at this pinnacle at age 23 is a bit scary. Fortunately, she seems fearless.

 



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New and Notable
New and Notable: Chip Stephens Trio, "Relevancy" (2013, Capri Records)
Written by Glenn A. Mitchell, LA Jazz Scene   

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Relevancy
I first heard Chip Stephens and his amazing piano playing on a deliciously groovy two-disc CD of famed trombonist Curtis Fuller, titled I Will Tell Her (2010), which I reviewed for L.A. Jazz Scene and Jazz Police website as well.  What stood out about Stephens' playing on several selections from this CD were his amazing, incredible piano runs and his beautifully full chordal voicings.

That work is continued on his latest CD, Relevancy, one of the best, in my opinion, from 2013.  His trio is made up of bassist Dennis Carroll and drummer Joel Spencer, all sturdy and excellent performers who have been working together a number of years.  There are eight tracks on this CD -- three original by Stephens and five other very well picked selections.  One of my favorites is Stephens' “C Hips Blues,” ten minutes of some great chords, piano lines and groovy solos from all of the trio members.    Two more originals (and excellent) are “A Day in May,” and “Somewhere Before the End.”  Two better known tunes are “34 Skidoo” (by Bill Evans) and Jimmy Van Heusen’s “Like Someone in Love.”  The CD begins with a perky number by Carla Bley, “Syndrome,” that gives the trio a real workout and defines each musician’s strength, especially in their solos.    This CD is one that affords the listener lots of exceptional jazz from Chip Stephens Trio from Capri Records: www.caprirecords.com

Reprinted from L.A. Jazz Scene, July 2014 issue



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Keith Jarrett/Gary Peacock/Jack DeJohnette, Somewhere (2013, ECM)
Written by Andrea Canter, Contributing Editor   

ImageI didn't get a chance to listen to Somewhere until well after its release. Now I can't stop listening. It's telling that the latest album from what has been commonly dubbed the Keith Jarrett Standards Trio was released under the three names, highlighting the nature of the thirty years' collaboration among three of the most singular talents in jazz. Somewhere marks the trio's first release since recording material in 2001 that found its way onto three albums released between 2004-2009. And at that, the "new" release was recorded in 2009, live at the KKL Luzern Concert Hall in Switzerland. But it was definitely worth the wait as Somewhere proves the trio's lack of recent discography reflects no loss of empathy or ingenuity as they cover familiar standards from Miles Davis and Harold Arlen and a pair from West Side Story, as well as two from Jarrett himself.

An intertwining of Jarrett's "Deep Space" with Miles' "Solar" starts with Jarrett's solo explorations, hollow-toned sonic crystals a la Marilyn Crispell, the trio sliding delicately into "Solar" as if the intro belonged there all along. Jarrett's right hand and left hand seem to come from different minds before the trio adds a measure of swing, Peacock adding a large helping of propulsive basslines, DeJohnette taking rhythm for a ride. Jarrett has never been more dazzling. "Stars Fell on Alabama" is simply luxurious, Jarrett elegant, Peacock complimenting every note. There's traces of Monk (especially "I Mean You") throughout the trio's playful arrangement of Arlen's "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea," as each musician inserts his own quirky rhythmic alterations. (And was that really a snippet of the Andy Griffith Show theme song?)

The two Leonard Bernstein tracks give the Trio their centrifugal force, with "Somewhere" (and Jarrett's addendum "Everywhere") stretching out to nearly 20 minutes of exquisite interplay. There's so much going on worthy of comment, from Jarrett's circuitous but upwardly mobile blues to DeJohnette's a-fib heartbeats to the slowing pulse of the coda. "Tonight" is far more upbeat, even swinging, Jarrett joyriding over the highway driving of bass and drums. The Van Heusen/Mercer chestnut, "I Thought About You," closes the set, showcasing the improvisational talents of the Trio, Jarrett throwing in a side of Gershwin along the way to a sumptuous finish.

Prone to tantrums and meltdowns in live performance, Keith Jarrett still remains arguably the artist best suited to the spontaneity of live interaction, and the trio of Jarrett, Peacock and DeJohnette the epitome of collaborative improvisation. And Somewhere should be heard "Everywhere."



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